Social Media Daily News Roundup 21.08.19

Today’s social media news, rounded up in one place so you don’t have to go anywhere else. 

🌴 Facebook finally launches its ‘clear history' tool, starting in Ireland, South Korea and Spain

🌴 Facebook will hire journalists to curate its coming dedicated news section

🌴  YouTube updates manual claiming policies to improve fairness for creators

🌴 Social media pressures 'driving up exam stress in girls'

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Facebook finally launches its ‘clear history' tool, starting in Ireland, South Korea and Spain - Social Media Today 

It's been a long time coming, but Facebook has finally announced the initial rollout of its promised 'clear history' tool, which will enable users to see the websites and apps which send Facebook information when they use them, remove that information from their account, and turn off Facebook's ability to store the same going forward.

The tool will give users more capacity to manage how their data is utilized by Facebook and advertisers - though it is worth noting, as pointed out by Marketing Land, that the data is not actually deleted, but is disconnected from your profile, facilitating a similar, but not the same result.


Facebook will hire journalists to curate its coming dedicated news section - Social Media Today 

It must feel a little like deja vu at Facebook right now.

Earlier this month, reports began circulating that The Social Network was working on a new, dedicated news tab, with the company reportedly offering news outlets "millions of dollars" for the rights to put their content in this new news section. Now, the next element of Facebook's news offering has been revealed - and it's starting to sound a lot like the Trending News section which Facebook got rid of last year. 

According to The New York Times, Facebook will hire a team of journalists to work on its news section, with the positions for these new roles now being advertised on Facebook's website.


YouTube updates manual claiming policies to improve fairness for creators - We R SM 

YouTube has updated its manual claiming policies, making it more difficult for copyright holders to file unfair claims against creators.

In April YouTube’s CEO Susan Wojcicki said it was a top priority to improve creators’ experience with copyright claims, and specifically a worrying trend of “aggressive manual claiming of very short music clips used in monetised videos.”

Claims like these can feel particularly unfair for creators since they end up transferring all revenue from a creator to a copyright claimant “regardless of the amount of music claimed.” They are also problematic since they also cover unintentional use of music – music that may be playing in the background, for example.

Recently, YouTube started requiring “copyright owners to provide timestamps for all manual claims” so that creators could know exactly which part of one of their videos is being claimed for copyright. The company also made several updates to its editing tools in Creator Studio that allows creators to use those timestamps to remove manually claimed content from their videos, thus “automatically releasing the claim and restoring monetisation” on a video.


Social media pressures 'driving up exam stress in girls' - The Guardian 

Publicity-hungry schools and pressure to post results on social media are driving up exam stress among girls, the Girlguiding movement has said, after it found that close to two-thirds of girls now believe there is too much pressure to succeed.

On the eve of the GCSE results the charity said girls were facing a perfect storm of pressures, with well over half of those aged 11 to 21 fearing a bad performance in exams could ruin their futures.

With some schools having put up banners boasting about their A-level results and an expectation that girls will post about their results online, 65% of those polled for Girl Guiding said there was too much pressure and focus on doing well in exams, with half saying exam stress affected their happiness.




Jade Halstead