Social Media Daily News Roundup 10.05.19

Here’s today’s (almost daily) social media news roundup.

Facebook adds new digital birthday cards as part of its push into stories

Instagram Removes Likes in New Trial

Time's Up, TikTok: Labels, Publishers Eye Better Licensing Deals With the Buzz-Making App

YouTube's subscription music streaming service lags far behind its biggest competitors

social media news image (10).png

Facebook adds new digital birthday cards as part of its push into stories

Facebook has long been a reliable way to keep track of friends’ and family members’ birthdays. But with the company de-emphasizing sharing to the News Feed, some people — particularly in North America — have begun to opt out of posting daily birthday greetings. Facebook announced a new feature designed to get everyone posting birthday wishes again: birthday stories, a new set of templates for posting well wishes as ephemeral Facebook stories.

Instagram Removes Likes in New Trial

Could Instagram’s new trial of removing likes radically alter our relationship with the social media platform as we know it? It may well do, and this is something Instagram is currently experimenting with.

Time's Up, TikTok: Labels, Publishers Eye Better Licensing Deals With the Buzz-Making App

Video-sharing app TikTok, which consumers use to post their own takes on viral dance challenges and memes, helped propel Lil Nas X's "Old Town Road" to the top of the Billboard Hot 100, where it has remained for five weeks in a row. But just as the music industry is embracing the service as a valuable promotional vehicle, some of its most important licensing deals are expiring -- and labels and publishers are trying to negotiate new ones that will generate more revenue.

YouTube's subscription music streaming service lags far behind its biggest competitors

YouTube may be the king of online video, but its subscription music streaming service is trailing far behind its biggest competitors.  

According to a report in Bloomberg, Google now has 15 million paid subscribers — a number that includes customers on free trials, per sources  — across its two paid music streaming services, YouTube Music and Google Play Music. (The search giant has not made their subscriber base public; the number comes from two sources familiar with the subscription numbers.)

Lucy Hall