Social Media Daily News Roundup 23.04.19

Here’s today’s daily social media news roundup.

We’ve included news stories, in depth articles, hot topics and practical features we’ve discovered all about social media. Enjoy!

Instagram Is Experimenting With Hiding Likes, Which Would Make It Much Harder to Be an Influencer

Facebook Takes Another Stab at the Virtual Assistant Market

Ask Facebook, Snapchat, Twitter and Instagram your burning questions.

Big brands turn to TikTok for 'cut-price' influencer marketing campaigns

How Fanbytes harnesses the power of TikTok

The CIA is joining Instagram

Twitter, Snapchat and YouTube Outline New Data and Provide New Tools for Earth Day

The Instagram trap: Social influence is helping women build brands—as long as they follow the rules

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Instagram Is Experimenting With Hiding Likes, Which Would Make It Much Harder to Be an Influencer

Imagine an Instagram where no one can see how many followers or likes you have. Now imagine being an influencer who suddenly has those metrics—the exact numbers you use to cement your influencer status—hidden to the public. Fast Company reported earlier today that, unfortunately for the Olivia Jades of the world, Instagram is indeed experimenting with hiding likes. Researcher Jane Manchun Wong discovered the development and shared a screenshot on Twitter. Instagram confirmed to TechCrunch that the design is an internal prototype not visible to the public yet.

Facebook Takes Another Stab at the Virtual Assistant Market

Last year, Facebook (NASDAQ:FB) pulled the plug on M, its AI-powered virtual assistant for Messenger, after running a closed beta in the San Francisco Bay Area for two and a half years. M responded to certain queries and requests, like making a reservation at a local restaurant, but it never matched the capabilities of other full-featured virtual assistants.

Ask Facebook, Snapchat, Twitter and Instagram your burning questions.

Next week SocialDay London will host some of the most exciting brands and agencies innovating in social media and influencer marketing. Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat and Twitter representatives will all be speaking and there will be opportunity to ask burning questions.

Big brands turn to TikTok for 'cut-price' influencer marketing campaigns

Some of the world's biggest consumer brands are increasingly turning to the controversial video-sharing app TikTok to expand marketing campaigns at a cut-price rate.

Sony, Fifa, Calvin Klein, Huawei and Coca Cola are among dozens of brands to have worked on "influencer marketing" campaigns on the Chinese social network with more than 500m users.

According to marketing analysts, TikTok is increasingly seen as a way to get a cut-price deal while still reaching millions of potential customers.

The app has proved hugely popular with under-18s and has more than 4m users in the UK.

How Fanbytes harnesses the power of TikTok

Having made its name as a pioneering marketing start-up on Snapchat, Fanbytes has now expanded its offering to Instagram and, most recently, TikTok.

The company, started by 23 year-old Timothy Armoo (pictured), launched on TikTok just a few months ago and has already enjoyed significant success with a wide range of artists and labels, offering song promotions as well as artist growth services on the platform.

Examples of their artist promotion capabilities are seen with two indie artists, Ruth Anne from The Other Songs and AWAL’s Patrick Martin.

The CIA is joining Instagram

The Central Intelligence Agency will soon be launching an Instagram account, Director Gina Haspel said last week — and Instagram is helping them set it up.

On Thursday, Director Haspel addressed a crowd at Auburn University in Alabama and mentioned that the CIA would soon have a presence on Instagram. The agency already has Facebook and Twitter accounts where they thirst for young talent with memes, and Instagram would be the intelligence agency’s latest foray into social media.

The Instagram trap: Social influence is helping women build brands—as long as they follow the rules

Tyler Haney was fed up. Last November, she was trying to fill an executive role at her athleisure company, Outdoor Voices, and had brought in an external recruiting firm. Haney had been clear about what she was looking for, but the recruiters seemed oblivious to—or disdainful of—her wishes. So the 30-year-old founder and CEO went on her In­stagram account and posted a sweaty gym selfie to her nearly 50,000 followers with an impassioned caption: “I may look sweet and people call me cute . . . but underneath it all I am a BEAST. It’s wild how many people try to chip away at this strength on a daily basis.”

Twitter, Snapchat and YouTube Outline New Data and Provide New Tools for Earth Day

To mark the importance of Earth Day, several social platforms have released new tools and options to help raise awareness, and enable users to participate in the same.

First off, on Twitter - as with most major events, Twitter has released a new collection of 'hashflags' - or hashtags with automatic emojis attached - to mark the event.


Lucy Hall