Social Media Weekend News Roundup 18.03.19

The social media news from the weekend, rounded up in one place so you don’t have to go anywhere else.

🌵Facebook’s News Feed era is now officially over

🌵Twitter to Introduce a ‘Subscribe to Conversation’ Feature

🌵Twttr is (very subtly) better than Twitter

🌵YouTube creators are using a hilarious tactic to combat copyright policies

🌵More incredible speakers announced for the Social Media Festival 1-3rd May

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Facebook’s News Feed era is now officially over

Last May, after a decade of uncommon stability in his executive ranks, Mark Zuckerberg announced a series of dramatic changes. He moved two top executives to create a new blockchain division, and installed new leaders at WhatsApp and the News Feed. (He also appointed someone to run a new group focused on privacy initiatives, which was never heard from again.) And for Chris Cox, the company’s chief product officer and one of Zuckerberg’s most trusted lieutenants, the move represented a consolidation of power: Leaders of the Facebook app, Instagram, WhatsApp, Messenger would now all report to him.

Twitter to Introduce a ‘Subscribe to Conversation’ Feature

Twitter is working on a feature that will allow users to follow specific threads with a ‘subscribe to conversation’ button. Subscribing is a way for users to follow a conversation without engaging with it directly. Rather than liking or replying to a thread, users can just click the subscribe button to easily go back to it.

Twttr is (very subtly) better than Twitter

Twitter made its beta testing app, branded “twttr,” sound so mysterious, like accessing it would give you access to some super-secret prototype version of Twitter (or at least that’s what I was imagining). The reality is it’s almost disappointingly similar to basic, vanilla Twitter — but what few changes there are, I appreciate.

YouTube creators are using a hilarious tactic to combat copyright policies

YouTube creators and Twitch streamers have been performing terrible a capella covers of popular songs in hilarious attempts to get around YouTube’s widely criticized copyright strike system.

In recent months, YouTube creators have run into copyright issues while making TikTok reaction videos, where they collect cringey TikTok clips and either react or provide commentary on them. But those TikTok videos contain music from artists signed to labels like Sony and Warner, and those labels will issue copyright claims, preventing creators from magnetizing their videos.


More incredible speakers announced for the Social Media Festival 1-3rd May

Lucy Hall