Social Media Weekend News Roundup 25.02.19

The roundup of the social media news from this weekend. In one place so you don’t have to go anywhere else.

🎟 Facebook attacked over app that reveals period dates of its users

🎟 Facebook Messenger Tests a Separate Folder for Business Messages

🎟 Instagram may offer a public option for collections à la Pinterest

🎟 Twitter Brings Reverse-Chronological Feed Option To Lite, Twitter For Windows, And Its Mobile Site

🎟 YouTube must clean up its act to keep advertisers on side  

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Facebook attacked over app that reveals period dates of its users

Facebook is battling fresh controversy on both sides of the Atlantic amid claims that it has been receiving highly personal data from third-party apps.

The swirl of bad news around the company comes after its chief executive, Mark Zuckerberg, was criticised for meeting the culture secretary, Jeremy Wright, having refused to appear before an influential parliamentary committee in Westminster.

Facebook Messenger Tests a Separate Folder for Business Messages

Facebook is testing a new way of organising messages from business pages in Messenger. Social Media Examiner discovered this update and shared an example on their page:

Twitter Brings Reverse-Chronological Feed Option To Lite, Twitter For Windows, And Its Mobile Site

Twitter is bringing its recently-launched “sparkle button” to its Lite app, the Twitter app for Windows, and mobile.twitter.com

After testing the ability for users to switch between “top Tweets” and a reverse-chronological timeline of “latest Tweets” last year, Twitter brought the feature to iOS first in December, and then to Android the next month. The “sprinkle button” found within the mobile apps allows users to toggle which view of Tweets they want to be able to see at any time.

Instagram may offer a public option for collections à la Pinterest

Instagram isn’t averse to nabbing features from other social media apps. In 2016, for example, it launched Snapchat-like Stories without even bothering to dream up a new name for the feature.

YouTube must clean up its act to keep advertisers on side  

The old adage that it takes years to build a reputation but just moments to lose one seems particularly apt with regards to the increasingly-tense situation between YouTube and its advertisers.

Lucy Hall