Social Media Daily News Roundup 18.12.18

Today’s social media news rounded up in one place so you don’t have to go anywhere else. Malware pulls from code hidden in memes posted to twitter. Facebook parties like it’s 2017, Instagram was the most effective platform for Russian actors spreading misinformation, Snapchat screen play most wanted in Hollywood, Pinterest reveals most popular health and wellness trends and social media’s forever war.

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New malware pulls its instructions from code hidden in memes posted to Twitter

Security researchers said they’ve found a new kind of malware that takes its instructions from code hidden in memes posted to Twitter. (TechCrunch)


After a year from hell, Facebook parties like it's 2017

The network held its Christmas party at the Palace of Fine Arts in San Francisco – but was there much to celebrate after a year of scandal? (Guardian)

Instagram was the 'most effective' platform for Russian actors spreading misinformation, says Senate-commissioned report

Russian actors seeking to spread misinformation around the 2016 U.S. presidential election found the most success on Facebook-owned Instagram, according to a new independent report commissioned by the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence. (CNBC)

This Snapchat screenplay is the most wanted in Hollywood right now

A screenplay about the birth of Snapchat has just been crowned the most-liked script to make the rounds in Hollywood this year, according to an annual industry list. It's called Frat Boy Genius, and is a fictionalized docu-drama about Evan Spiegel and the creation of Snapchat. (Madhable)

Pinterest reveals most popular health and wellness trends for 2019

If you’d just about got your head around understanding the benefits of buti yogaand the acronym CBD, you might want to take a deep breath because there are a whole host of new health and wellness trends coming your way in 2019. (Independent)

Social Media’s Forever War

A year ago, in his annual New Year’s resolution post, Mark Zuckerberg pledged to spend 2018 fixing Facebook by addressing foreign manipulation, election interference and other threats. He and other tech leaders should probably renew that vow for 2019, and 2020, and possibly every year after that. (New York Times)


Stuart Hall